Voters Polled On Earned Time

CRIME VICTIMS UNITED


CRIME VICTIMS UNITED OF OREGON

June 17, 2003
For Immediate Release


BI-PARTISAN MAJORITIES OPPOSE LEGISLATIVE PROPOSALS TO WEAKEN MEASURE 11 AND STATE SENTENCING GUIDELINES

According to two new statewide polls, 77% of Oregonians oppose reducing prison terms for violent criminals and 64% oppose shorter prison terms for property and other crimes

Portland – Two new polls released today by Crime Victims United of Oregon show that legislative proposals to weaken Measure 11 and state sentencing guidelines are strongly opposed by a majority of Oregonians. The legislature is currently considering changes to Ballot Measure 11, approved by voters in 1994, and state sentencing guidelines implemented in 1989.

Both polls were conducted by Moore Information of Portland May 18-19 and June 9-10 and have a margin of error of 5%.

77% of Oregonians oppose allowing Measure 11 prisoners who have been convicted of murder, first and second degree manslaughter, assault, kidnapping, robbery, rape and child molestation to reduce their prison terms by as much as 30% by showing good behavior and participation in work rehabilitation programs while 64% of Oregonians oppose reducing prison terms for property and other crimes under current state sentencing guidelines.

“Oregonians have made public safety a top priority and they want it to remain a top priority, “said Steve Doell, President of Crime Victims United of Oregon who commissioned the poll. “With these tougher laws, crime has gone down and safety has gone up. The legislature should stop efforts to weaken proven crime laws.”

In general, voters in every region of the state and from both political parties oppose weakening state crime laws; 67% of voters in Washington and Clackamas counties and the Willamette Valley; 53% of voters in Multnomah County and 65% of voters in Eastern, Southern and coastal Oregon. 72% of Republicans, 62% of Democrats and 55% Independents oppose shorter prison terms for violent and property offenses.


Oregon Voters and the Early Release of Measure 11 Criminals

Survey Methodology

Sample: 500 interviews among a representative sample of registered voters in Oregon.

Method: Telephone interviews conducted May 18-19, 2003.

Sampling Error: Plus or minus 4% at the 95% confidence level.

Question: As you may remember, Oregon voters passed Measure 11 by a two-to-one margin in 1994 and rejected an attempt to repeal Measure 11 in 2000 by a three-to-one margin.  It requires mandatory minimum sentences for 21 serious violent felonies, with no eligibility for any reduction in the sentence.

Do you favor or oppose allowing Measure 11 prisoners who have been convicted of murder, first and second degree manslaughter, assault, kidnapping, robbery, rape and child molestation to reduce their time behind bars by as much as 30% by showing good behavior and participation in work and rehabilitation programs?

Results:

Favor 14%
Oppose 77%
Don't Know 9%

Geographic Breakdown

Area Favor Oppose
Multnomah County 21% 66%
Washington and Clackamas Counties 13% 81%
Willamette Valley 13% 78%
Elsewhere 10% 81%

Gender Breakdown

Gender Favor Oppose
Male 16% 74%
Female 11% 81%

Age Breakdown

Age Favor Oppose
18-34 17% 71%
35-44 8% 86%
45-64 16% 76%
65+ 12% 77%

Party Breakdown

Party Favor Oppose
Republican 11% 80%
Democrat 15% 78%
Independent 14% 74%

Political Philosophy Breakdown

Philosophy Favor Oppose
Conservative 9% 83%
Moderate 14% 75%
Liberal 22% 68%

Oregon Voters and the Early Release of Criminals

Survey Methodology: 400 interviews among a representative sample of registered voters in Oregon.

Method: Telephone interviews conducted June 9-10, 2003.

Sampling Error: Plus or minus 5% at the 95% confidence level.

Question: Currently, most criminals convicted of felonies in Oregon can reduce their time in prison by as much as 20 percent for good behavior and participation in work and rehabilitation programs and can take an additional one month off their sentence for transitional leave.

This means a felony criminal sentenced to 30 months could be released after 23 months.

There is a proposal that would reduce time served for convicted felons by increasing sentence reductions for good behavior from 20% to 30% and transitional leave from one month to six months.

This would mean a felony criminal sentenced to 30 months could be released after just 15 months. Do you favor or oppose this proposal?

Results:

Favor 25%
Oppose 64%
Don't Know 11%

Geographic Breakdown

Area Favor Oppose
Multnomah County 32% 53%
Washington and Clackamas Counties 25% 67%
Willamette Valley 20% 67%
Elsewhere 25% 65%

Gender Breakdown

Gender Favor Oppose
Male 28% 60%
Female 21% 67%

Age Breakdown

Age Favor Oppose
18-34 24% 64%
35-44 28% 65%
45-64 28% 63%
65+ 19% 65%

Party Breakdown

Party Favor Oppose
Republican 19% 72%
Democrat 29% 62%
Independent 28% 55%

Political Philosophy Breakdown

Philosophy Favor Oppose
Conservative 15% 75%
Moderate 28% 59%
Liberal 44% 46%

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